Gala (Farmer’s Chess)

Gala or Farmer’s Chess is still played in some farming villages in Schleswig-Holstein, once in Denmark but now part of Germany. The goal of Gala is to capture both of the opponent’s kings or Galas.

Gala board
Figure 1: Gala board

Rules

The game is played by two players on a 10 x 10 board with the pieces arranged as shown in Figure 1 at the start of the game. The board consists of two parts: the four corner sections or castles of 4 x 4 squares and the center part, which is in the shape of a cross. The two parts are separated by the deflection line, so called because the pieces move differently after they cross the line.

Each player has the following pieces: two Galas (Kings), four Kornas (Bishops), six Horsas (Rooks) as well as eight Kampas (Pawns). The pieces are all the same shape, with the Gala or King being slightly larger. The pieces are distinguished by color, Galas have gold tops, the Kornas have green tops, the Horsas have red tops and the Kampas (Pawns) only have their basic color, black or white.

All the pieces including the Kampas capture by moving to the square occupied the opponent’s piece and that piece is removed from the board.

Gala moves
Figure 2: Gala moves

Gala or King

The Gala may move one square in any direction as shown in Figure 2. The Gala cannot capture when it is inside the cross. When it is on one of the four squares at the center of the board it may jump to any unoccupied square on the board except those that are the initial positions of the pieces.

If a player’s Gala is threatened with capture, it is usual for the player making the move to say "gala", and the player must move so that his Gala is no longer threatened. If there is no possible move to remove the threat, the Gala is captured.

Korna moves
Figure 3: Korna moves

Korna

The Korna may move one or more squares orthogonally outside the cross and one or more squares diagonally inside the cross. If the Korna crosses the deflection line with the first square he moves, he may also move any number of vacant squares (black lines in Figure 3). If the Korna has moved one or more squares before crossing the deflection line, he may then only move one square (red lines in Figure 3). If the Korna captures a piece when crossing the deflection line it may not make the additional move.

Horsa moves
Figure 4: Horsa moves

Horsa or Horseman

The Horsa may move one or more squares diagonally outside the cross and one or more squares orthogonally inside the cross. If the Horsa crosses the deflection line with the first square he moves, he may also move any number of vacant squares (black lines in Figure 4). If the Horsa has moved one or more squares before crossing the line, he may then only move one square (red lines in figure 4). If the Horsa captures a piece when crossing the deflection line it may not make an additional move. When crossing the deflection line from inside the cross, the Horsa is not allowed to capture a piece adjacent to the deflection line.

Kampa moves
Figure 5: Kampa moves

Kampa or Warrior

Kampas only move one square diagonally forwards when outside the cross and outside the opponent’s corners of the board. It may move two squares forward if the deflection line is not passed with the first move of the Kampa.

When the Kampa is inside the cross or in an opponent’s corner of the board, it may move one square in any direction. When a Kampa is moved back to a corner side of the board, it can only move diagonally forward again.

Kampas can only capture when they are inside the cross. A Kampa cannot capture as it crosses the deflection line into the cross.

Play

Players take turns and advance across the board attempting to capture their opponent’s Galas. A player wins when he has captured both of the opponent’s Galas. If each player has a single Gala on the board the game is a draw.